2010

Brian Boitano
Brian Boitano
Brian Boitano, the only American man to win a gold medal at the 1988 Winter Olympics, forged a reputation as one of history’s most athletic figure skaters. At the age of eight, he took his first lessons in his hometown of Sunnyvale. He won numerous national championships before his triumph at the Calgary Games, where he became the first skater in Olympic history to land eight triple jumps in the same program.  His ice skates from that performance are in the Smithsonian Institution. Boitano later won 20 professional championships and won an Emmy for his performance in "Carmen on Ice." In 1996, he became a World Figure Skating Hall of Fame inductee. 
Inducted into the Bay Area Sports Hall of Fame in 2010.
Plaque location: TBA
Bert Campaneris
Bert Campaneris
Bert Campaneris is the Cuban-born shortstop and speedy leadoff hitter for the Oakland Athletics teams that won consecutive World Series Championships from 1972 through 1974, the only team other than the Yankees to win that many in a row. Campaneris led the American League in stolen bases six times and played in six league All Star games. Though noted for his power hitting, his two-run homer against the Mets in the ’73 series started the A’s’ winning rally in the deciding seventh game. He also hit two homeruns in his first major league game in 1964, only the third player in big league history to accomplish that feat.
Inducted into The Bay Area Sports Hall of Fame in 2010.
Plaque location: SFO Gate 80
Al Davis
Al Davis
As a coach first and then as the managing general partner, Al Davis turned the Oakland Raiders into one of the most successful franchises in professional football. Building on an unwavering philosophy that stressed a strong-armed quarterback, a powerful offensive line and a man-to-man defense, Davis’s teams played in five Super Bowls and, in an eight-year period beginning in 1976, won three of them. In Davis’s first 40 years with the franchise, the team suffered only seven losing seasons, won 12 division championships and played in 12 conference championship games. For many years, his teams were known for a physical, almost intimidating style of play. Davis also was renown for hiring the first African-American coach in the modern NFL and hiring a female as his team’s chief executive. Davis was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1992.
Inducted into the Bay Area Sports Hall of Fame in 2010.
Plaque location: SFO Gate 81
Steve Negoesco
Steve Negoesco
Steve Negoesco, who played (1947-51), and coached (1962-2000) soccer at the University of San Francisco, was one of the greatest of both. He was an All-American, the first from the West Coast, in 1948, and helped the Dons to a share of the National Championship in the 1949 season. The first Division I Coach to win 500 games, he finished with 544, a national record at the time. His teams made 25 NCAA tournament appearances, winning five national titles. He won 22 conference titles, compiled 34 winning seasons, including 15 with 15 or more victories. He is a member of the National Soccer Coaches Association Hall of Fame, and the Dons’ home field, dedicated in 1982, is named for him.
Inducted into the Bay Area Sports Hall of Fame in 2010.
Plaque location: TBA
R. C. Owens
R. C. Owens
R. C. Owens had a productive NFL career, but is best remembered for one play, the "Alley Oop," when he leaped high between defensive backs to catch this pass. The play was a natural for Owens, a college basketball player who led the nation with 27 rebounds a game one year. Owens caught 27 passes for 395 yards in 1957, his rookie year. His best year was 1961, when he caught 55 passes for 1,032 yards. A free agent in 1962, he signed with the Baltimore Colts and in a game against the Washington Redskins, he blocked a 40-yard field goal attempt. Following the 1963 season, R. C. was traded to the New York Giants in 1964, and retired at the end of the season.
Inducted into the Bay Area Sports Hall of Fame in 2010.
Plaque location: BASHOF
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