2009

Dave Casper
Roger Craig
Nicknamed “The Ghost” after the cartoon character, Dave Casper played seven seasons for the Oakland Raiders. He established himself as one of the NFL’s most dangerous receivers while playing tight end, a blocking position in most offenses. Although Casper was a fine blocker, he was more famous for his “Ghost To The Post” pass patterns. He was selected to play in five Pro Bowls and was a member of the Raiders Super Bowl XI Championship Team of 1977. In that game, he scored the first touchdown on a pass from Ken Stabler in the 32-14 win over the Minnesota Vikings. He was also a key participant in the Raiders’ infamous “Holy Roller” play against San Diego in 1978. Trailing 20 to 14 with ten seconds left to play, first Stabler, then running back Pete Banaszek, fumbled the ball forward before Casper propelled it into the end zone and fell on it for the winning touchdown. Predictably enough, this event provoked a hasty rules change. But The Ghost’s fame lay in catching the ball, not nudging it forward on the ground.
Inducted into the Bay Area Sports Hall of Fame in 2009.
Plaque location: SFO Gate 87
Billie Jean King
Billie Jean King
Billie Jean King was not only the finest women’s player of her time—the winner of 39 grand slam singles, doubles and mixed doubles—she was also her sport’s inspirational leader off the court. She was the founder of the Women’s Tennis Association, a co-founder of World TeamTennis and a major influence in the formation of the Virginia Slims Professional Tour. Her straight-set victory over Bobby Riggs in the highly publicized “Battle of the Sexes” in 1973 at the Houston Astrodome before a national television audience gave tennis new popularity and credibility. That same year she campaigned successfully to secure equal prize money for all players at the U.S. Open Championships. Her tireless promotional efforts on behalf of their sport eventually served to advance the cause of all women’s sports and helped secure the passage of Title IX, which extended equal opportunity to women in school athletics.
Inducted into The Bay Area Sports Hall of Fame in 2009.
Plaque location: SFO Gate 87
*photo by Russ Adams
Craig Morton
Craig Morton
At the completion of his 1964 All America Season at Cal, Craig Morton held virtually every school record for passing. His then-record 36 touchdown passes, achieved in three seasons and in schedules shorter by one or two games, survived for 25 years after his graduation. In 1964, he won the Pop Warner Award as the most valuable player on the West Coast and was made a first round selection by the Dallas Cowboys in the NFL Draft. He played 18 seasons of pro football for the Cowboys, the New York Giants and the Denver Broncos and was the first quarterback to start for two different teams in the Super Bowl—for Dallas in 1970 and Denver in 1977. Altogether, he played in 11 post season games. At age 38, in his penultimate year as a pro, he still was able to pass for more than 3000 yards and for 21 touchdowns.
Inducted into the Bay Area Sports Hall of Fame in 2009.
Plaque location: SFO Gate 80
Gaylord Perry
Gaylord Perry
Gaylord Perry began his distinguished 22 year major league career with the San Francisco Giants in 1962. Before the end of that decade, he and BASHOF Enshrinee Juan Marichal had formed one of the most potent one-two pitching combinations of the time. In 1966, Perry won 21 games, the first of five seasons during which he would win 20 or more. He and Marichal combined for 46 wins that season with only 14 losses. Four years later, Perry had a truly spectacular year for the Giants, leading the National League with 23 wins, 41 starts, 329 innings pitched and five shutouts. He also tied for second with the Cardinals’ Bob Gibson with 23 complete games, one behind the Cubs’ Ferguson Jenkins. Twice Perry would lead the American League (after his trade to Cleveland in 1972) in complete games, a statistical category all but extinct in the modern game. All told, Perry pitched a total of 303 complete games, won 314 games, had a record 3534 strikeouts, became the first pitcher to win Cy Young Awards in both leagues, and earned an intimidating and possibly even deserved reputation for lubricating his pitches.
Inducted into the Bay Area Sports Hall of Fame in 2009.
Plaque location: SFO Gate 80
*photo ©2009 S.F. Giants
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