2008

Roger Craig
Roger Craig
Renowned for his high-knee-action running style, Roger Craig became the first player ever to score three touchdowns in the Super Bowl during the 49ers’ 38-16 win over the Miami Dolphins in XIX.  The next season (1985), he became the first player in NFL history to both run and receive passes for 1000 yards or more—1050 yards rushing on 214 carries and 1016 yards receiving on a league-leading 92 receptions.  In 1988, he was named NFL Offensive Player of the Year by the Associated Press , ran for a career-high 1,502 yards, and caught an additional 76 passes for 534 yards.  In the 49ers' 20-16 win over Cincinnati in the Super Bowl, he rushed for 71 yards and caught eight passes for 101 yards.  He played one season with the Los Angeles Raiders and two with the Minnesota Vikings before retiring in 1993. He appeared in the NFL Playoffs all 11 years of his career, played in three winning Super Bowls, and made the Pro Bowl four times (1985, 1987, 1988, 1989). 
Inducted into the Bay Area Sports Hall of Fame in 2008.
Plaque location: Candlestick Park
Edward (Eddie) DeBartolo, Jr.
Eddie DeBartolo
Edward DeBartolo, Jr. came to the Bay Area when he purchased the San Francisco 49ers from the Morabito family in 1977. Everything took off in 1979, when Eddie hired Bill Walsh as his coach and brought in great players such as Joe Montana, Jerry Rice, Ronnie Lott, and Roger Craig. With Walsh establishing the “West Coast Offense," the team won five Super Bowl Championships in 12 years under DeBartolo’s ownership, a record still unmatched in the National Football League! Die-hard 49er fans had never experienced such euphoria, and the success he brought to them has never been forgotten. As it has been written, “It really was a period of time like Camelot…and greatly impacted sports in the Bay Area.” As well as putting together great football teams, DeBartolo built a reputation as a very caring owner, and the organization became known as a real 49er family. DeBartolo also has been a major contributor and supporter of a great number of Bay Area causes.
Inducted into The Bay Area Sports Hall of Fame in 2008.
Plaque location: TBD
Edward DeBartolo, Jr. is the first person to be inducted in the new “Distinguished Achievement” category, which honors off-field performers who have “made an extraordinary impact on the sports history of the Bay Area.” DeBartolo was elected by a special panel of former banquet chairmen, past enshrinees, sports broadcasters and writers.
Rick DeMont
Rick DeMont
During his swimming career in the 1970s, San Rafael-born Rick DeMont established world records in the 1500-meter freestyle, the 400-meter freestyle and the 4x100-meter freestyle relay. He won the 400-meter freestyle in the 1972 Olympics, but his gold medal was taken away by what was originally thought to be traces of a banned substance but was later found to be allergy medicine. DeMont was banned from further Olympic competition and unable to defend his world record title in the 1500-meter freestyle. Nevertheless, DeMont’s swimming career was not defined by the medal. In 1973, he won the 400-meter event in the World Championships in Belgrade, Yugoslavia. He was the first man to swim the 400-meter freestyle in less than four minutes and was voted Swimmer of the Year. After years of investigation, the International Olympic Committee acknowledged that it had erred in depriving him of this Gold Medal and reinstated him on the 1972 Olympic Team roster. His medal, however, was never returned.
Inducted into the Bay Area Sports Hall of Fame in 2008.
Plaque location: BASHOF
Ray Guy
Ray Guy
Ray Guy was one of the greatest punters in NFL history. Coming from the University of Southern Mississippi, in 1973, he was the first pure punter ever selected in the first round of the NFL draft by the Oakland Raiders. Only once in his 14 years as a Raider did he average less than 40 yards, and his career average of 42.4 was achieved on a total of 1049 punts. Guy was a key member of three Super Bowl-winning Raiders teams: Super Bowls XI, XV, and XVIII. His best performance may well have been Super Bowl XVIII against the Washington Redskins. When the Raiders offense faltered just outside the range of placekicker Chris Bahr, Guy, known for his power, used finesse instead to boot a 27-yard punt that pinned the Washington Redskins on their own 12-yard line late in the first half. On the very next play, Jack Squirek intercepted a pass by Washington quarterback Joe Theismann and returned it for a touchdown that gave the Raiders a 21-3 halftime lead. The Raiders would eventually win 38-9. Guy retired in 1986.
Inducted into the Bay Area Sports Hall of Fame in 2008.
Plaque location: Oakland Coliseum
Burl Toler Sr.
Burt Toler
Burt Toler was the rock-solid center and linebacker on the now justly celebrated University of San Francisco team of 1951, which finished undefeated, untied, and uninvited to a post-season bowl game, mainly because two of its great stars, Toler and Ollie Matson, were African-American. On a roster boasting three future NFL Hall of Famers—Matson, Gino Marchetti and Bob St. Clair—Toler was considered by his teammates the most accomplished of all, roaming from sideline to sideline making tackles. Unfortunately, Burl never got a chance to prove he could make it in the NFL because of a knee injury suffered in the 1952 College All-Star game against the then-Los Angeles Rams, which ended his playing career. In a strange twist of fate, Toler became a top NFL official and lasted longer in the league than any of his former teammates—25 years. Toler also taught for 17 years at Benjamin Franklin Middle School and served as the secondary school principal in the district. In 2006, Toler was acknowledged as a great educator and community leader, and the school was renamed "Burl A. Toler Middle School" in his honor.
Inducted into the Bay Area Sports Hall of Fame in 2008.
Plaque location: University of San Francisco
© 2008 Bay Area Sports Hall of Fame