2007

Jennifer Azzi
Jennifer Azzi
As Stanford’s first All American woman basketball player, Jennifer Azzi led the Cardinal to the school’s first NCAA Women’s Championship in 1990 and received the coveted Naismith Trophy as the nation’s top collegiate woman player that year.  She was also the Most Valuable Player of the women’s Final Four.  A speedy, sharp-shooting guard, she finished her collegiate career as Stanford’s all-time leader in steals and assists and as the second leading scorer.  She was also durable, starting in 122 of the 124 games played in her four years there.  After graduation, she starred on the 1996 Gold Medal women’s team in the Olympic Games at Atlanta and played professionally both in Europe and with the WNBA in the United States. 
Inducted into the Bay Area Sports Hall of Fame in 2007.
Plaque location: TBD
Will Clark
Will Clark
Will Clark earned his nickname, “Will the Thrill”, in his first major league at-bat with the San Francisco Giants, slugging a home run off baseball Hall of Famer Nolan Ryan on April 8, 1986.  Blessed with an elegant batting stroke, he hit .308 with 35 homers in his second season and led the National League with 109 runs-batted-in in his third.  In 1989, he hit .333, second in the league only to perennial champion Tony Gwynn.  He averaged an astonishing .650 batting average with eight RBIs in the 1989 League Championship Series and his bases-loaded single in the eighth inning of the deciding game sent the Giants to their first World Series in 27 years.  That clutch hit stands as one of the most dramatic in franchise history.  In eight seasons with San Francisco he hit for an average of .299 with 176 homers and 709 RBIs. 
Inducted into the Bay Area Sports Hall of Fame in 2007.
Plaque location: AT&T Park
Jerry Coleman
Jerry Coleman
Jerry Coleman signed with the New York Yankees after graduation from San Francisco’s Lowell High School in 1942, but served instead as a decorated Marine Corps fighter pilot in World War II.  He finally joined the Yankees in 1949 after several seasons in the franchise’s farm system and won Rookie of the Year honors.  A slick-fielding second baseman and clutch hitter, he was the Most Valuable Player of the 1950 World Series, twice driving home the winning run in the Yanks’ four-game sweep of the Philadelphia Phillies.  His career was again interrupted by a call to duty, this time in the Korean War and he missed most of the 1952 and 1953 seasons.  He retired as a player after hitting .364 in the seven-game 1957 World Series.  After his playing days were over, he enjoyed a long career in baseball broadcasting. 
Inducted into the Bay Area Sports Hall of Fame in 2007.
Plaque location: SFO Gate 85
Jerry Rice
Jerry Rice
Justifiably acclaimed as the greatest pass receiver in football history, Jerry Rice held at the time of his retirement twelve NFL regular season, seven post-season and nine Super Bowl records.  He left the game as the all-time leader in receptions (1549), receiving yards (23,540), touchdown receptions (198), and touchdowns overall (208).  He starred on three San Francisco 49er Super Bowl Championship teams, and was named the Most Valuable Player of Super Bowl XXIII when he caught 11 passes for 215 yards and a touchdown in the 49ers’ 20-16 win over Cincinnati.  He played 16 years in San Francisco as the favorite target of BASHOF enshrinees Joe Montana and Steve Young.  He played his final three-and-a-half years with the Oakland Raiders and a half-season with Seattle before retiring in 2004 at age 42. 
Inducted into the Bay Area Sports Hall of Fame in 2007.
Plaque location: Candlestick Park
© 2008 Bay Area Sports Hall of Fame