2001

Willie Brown
Willie Brown
Willie Brown played cornerback for the Oakland Raiders for 12 of his 16 playing years, from 1967-1978. He started for the Raiders in Super Bowl II and Super Bowl XI. A 75 yard interception return for a TD in Super Bowl XI was the highlight, but he still holds the pro record of at least one interception per season for all of his 16 years. He was named to four Pro Bowls and five AFL-All Star games. His 39 interceptions as a Raider is still a team record. One of the finest and most feared cornerbacks, he is in the Pro Football Hall of Fame.
Inducted into the Bay Area Sports Hall of Fame in 2001.
Plaque location: Oakland Coliseum
Tom Watson
Tom Watson
Tom Watson starred for the 1968-71 Stanford University golf team and then turned pro. He won 34 times on the PGA tour, including the 1981 Masters and the 1982 U.S. Open at Pebble Beach. He wasthe PGA Player of the Year six times. Watson's remarkable career includes five victories in the British Open. In 1999, at age 50, he joined the PGA senior tour and won the Bank One tournament, shooting 62 in the final round. He played on four Ryder Cup teams and was captain in 1993.
Inducted into the Bay Area Sports Hall of Fame in 2001.
Plaque location: Stanford University
David Wilcox
David Wilcox
David Wilcox was enshrined in the year 2000 by the Pro Football Hall of Fame for his exceptional and ferocious outside linebacking with the San Francisco 49ers of 1964-1974. He missed only one game and was elected to the Pro Bowl seven times, and, in 1967, received the Len Eshmont award. Wilcox had 14 interceptions in his career, even though the opponents usually ran, or passed, to the opposite side because he was so disruptive. In 1973, coaches gave him a 1,306 rating when 750 was considered excellent. That same year, he received the NFL Player's Association Linebacker of the Year award.
Inducted into the Bay Area Sports Hall of Fame in 2001.
Plaque location: TBD
Phil Woolpert
Phil Woolpert
Phil Woolpert was the basketball coach at University of San Francisco and came to national attention when he led his great 1955 and 1956 teams to NCAA titles. But perhaps more significant was his coaching of the '57 team, without superstars Bill Russell and Casey Jones, to the NCAA Final Four. His record was 154-78 for nine seasons, including a remarkable run of 60 straight wins. Woolpert was among the first to integrate, giving minutes to his players according to ability, not color. He died in 1987.
Inducted into the Bay Area Sports Hall of Fame in 2001.
Plaque location: University of San Francisco
© 2008 Bay Area Sports Hall of Fame